• SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN

    OBJECTIVES

    This module has been designed to give you:

    • An introduction to safeguarding children and child protection and the legislation that surrounds it
    • An introduction to child abuse, detailing the four main areas of abuse and highlighting warning signs to look out for
    • An understanding of harm and abuse
    • An understanding of your role in child protection
  • SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN

    NEGLECT

    There are various forms of physical and behavioural indicators that can identify if a child is being harmed or abused. Test your knowledge by dragging and dropping each of the statements on the right into the correct box.

    Please note drag and drop functionality is not compatible with smart phone or tablet devices. Please scroll to the next page or login from a computer.

    BEHAVIOURAL INDICATORS
    PHYSICAL INDICATORS
      Untreated medical problems  
      Poor skin and hair tone  
      Destructive tendencies  
      Inappropriate/poor clothing  
      Scavenging or scrounging  
      Underweight or obesity  
      Frequent lateness  
      Constant hunger & tiredness  
      Social isolation  
  • SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN

    Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

    (hover over for definition)

    Signs that may give you an indication that FGM may have taken place are where girls may: -

    • Have difficulty walking, sitting or standing
    • Spend longer than normal in the bathroom or toilet due to difficulties urinating
    • Prolonged or repeated absences from school
    • Request to not take part in swimming or PE activities
    • Have noticeable behaviour changes (e.g withdrawal or depression)
    • Spend long periods away from the classroom with bladder or menstrual problems
    • Ask for help, but may not be explicit about the problem due to embarrassment or fear

    If you suspect any form of female genital mutilation you must report this immediately to the person with designated responsibility for child protection in the setting (and your Headteacher if required under your school’s policy).

  • ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

    OBJECTIVES

    Building on the information you learnt in Module 1; Safeguarding Children, we now want to focus on the role you can play in safeguarding children and young people.

    In this module, you will:

    • Understand Ofsted or Estyn inspections relating to behaviour and safety
    • Understand your role and responsibilities in school
    • Learn about how to be vigilant and what to do with any information
    • Understand your role in normal child development
    • Learn how to maintain a child-focused approach
  • ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

    WHY MIGHT A CHILD TELL YOU
    THAT THEY ARE BEING ABUSED?

    A child might tell you because:

    • The fear of abuse becomes greater than the fear of what will happen if the child tells
    • A sibling may be at risk
    • The child may find you to be non-judgemental, non-critical and non-threatening
    • They feel you may be strong and confident, capable of overcoming the abuser
    • They may have a physical injury that needs attention
    Did you know?
  • ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

    WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF A CHILD
    CHOOSES TO TALK TO YOU?

    Always take notes of any disclosures of abuse OR any small piece of information that gives you cause for concern.

    Notes should cover:

    • WHO

      Report anything directly to the person with designated responsibility for child protection.

    • WHAT

      What you write must be 100% accurate, using the child’s language exactly not your own interpretation of events/words.

    • WHERE

      Give details (facts) of the date, time and location of the disclosure.

    • WHEN

      Speed of reporting is vital, it must be immediate.

  • HEALTH & SAFETY

    OBJECTIVES

    Anyone that works in education has a duty of care towards the children and young people in their care. Therefore, the purpose of this module is to:

    • Gain a better understanding of the general duty of care required towards children and young people
    • Give you an overview of the health and safety concerns that you may encounter
    • Ensure safe practice with educational visits and when delivering practical lessons
    • Confirm what to do in the event of an incident
    • Understand the issues around the use of force to maintain pupil safety
    • Understand the guidelines for screening, searching and confiscation
  • HEALTH & SAFETY

    EDUCATIONAL VISITS

    All staff must do their best to ensure the health and safety of everyone in the group and act as any reasonable parent would do in the same circumstances.

    When taking part in an educational visit you must always make sure that you have access to the risk assessment that has been completed in preparation for the educational visit, as well as having access to the school’s educational visit policy.

    You should: (Hover over the buttons below)

    • 1.
      Seek

      Seek advice from your school or organisation on insurance policies and cover for educational trips as well as risk assessment forms, policies and procedures.

    • 2.
      Follow

      Follow the instructions of the group leader and help with control and discipline.

    • 3.
      Consider

      Consider stopping the visit or the activity, if you think the risk to the health and safety of the children in your charge is unacceptable. Always notify the group leader.

    • 4.
      Remember

      This is still your responsibility, even if you are not directly leading the visit/activity.

  • HEALTH & SAFETY

    USE OF FORCE TO CONTROL
    OR RESTRAIN PUPILS

    According to legislation on discipline and child protection, it is not illegal to use reasonable force to prevent pupils from:

    • Committing a criminal offence (or juvenile equivalent)
    • Injuring themselves or others
    • Causing significant damage to property
    • Causing disorder

    However using force should only be as a protective measure, not a disciplinary penalty. It is always unlawful to use force as a punishment. This is because it would fall within the definition of corporal punishment.

    Using force to control or restrain a pupil should always be a last resort. It should always be reasonable and proportionate. In all circumstances please refer to your school policy.

    In the Department for Education guidance “Use of reasonable force – Advice for head teachers, staff and governing bodies” The use of force is now defined as:

    • Reasonable force is using no more force than is needed
    • Control; Passive physical contact is standing between pupils or blocking a pupil’s path
    • Control; Active physical contact is leading a pupil by the arm out of a classroom
    • Restraint is to hold back physically or to bring a pupil under control. This is used in more extreme circumstances
  • E-SAFETY & ANTI-BULLYING

    OVERVIEW – BULLYING

    • Under the Children Act 1989, a bullying incident should be addressed as a child protection concern when there is “reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering or is likely to suffer, significant harm”
    • Even where safeguarding is not considered to be an issue, schools will need to tackle the underlying issue which has contributed to a child being a ‘bully’
    • It should also be remembered that head teachers have the specific statutory power to discipline pupils for poor behaviour outside of the school premises
    • In the new Ofsted framework, behaviour and safety is one of the key criteria for inspections
    • Schools should be able to demonstrate the impact of anti-bullying policies

    www.beatbullying.org

  • E-SAFETY & ANTI-BULLYING

    E-SAFETY

    We are in a world of changing technology and we have a global idea of digital citizenship where everyone takes some responsibility for online behaviour.

    Test your knowledge. Which of the below statements are True or False?

    • 1. 9-16 year olds spend an average of 88 mins per day online
    • 2. 12% of 9-16 year olds have been bothered or upset by something on the internet
    • 3. Half of online bullies say they have also bullied people face to face
    • 4. Half of online bullies have been bullied face to face
    • 5. 59% of 9-16 year olds use social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Flickr
    • 6. 33% of 12-15 year olds speak to friends or friends of people they do not know online

    (Source – EU Kids Online September 2011)

  • E-SAFETY & ANTI-BULLYING

    CYBER-BULLYING

    Cyber-bullying is an extension of face-to-face bullying and can cause significant harm, ending even in death in extreme cases.

    It can take different forms:

    • Threats and intimidation
    • Harassment or "cyber stalking"
    • Vilification/defamation
    • Exclusion or peer rejection
    • Impersonation
    • Unauthorised publication of private information or images
    • Unprovoked attacks (e.g. happy slapping)
    • Sexting
    • Trolling

    Please click on the image to view Department for Education advice on preventing and tackling bullying.